Children and Parents

Finding Your Self-Esteem From Within

I grew up as a child actor and model, from ages two to eighteen.  I never did anything fame-worthy, but I did pose for Vogue Bambini and Rolling Stone Magazine, with Fleetwood Mac.  I also got to repeatedly stuff my face with cookies in a Pillsbury Cookie Dough commercial.   I loved being on set.  There was a sense of pride I felt, getting constant attention from directors, makeup artists, and cameramen, and it was addictive, because it gave me a sense of self-esteem.&n

Breastfeeding Promotes a Healthy Gut in Babies

It's important to have a healthy gut to keep the body functioning properly. When a person experiences problems with digestion, they may want to consider an organic detox to get their health back on track. A new study from Texas A&M University has found that one way to promote a healthy gut in children is to breastfeed them in infancy.

Fifty Shades of Embarrassment

Compromise. Commitment. Patience. My 20 years of marriage have taught me many things. One of the most important was how to read. Sure, I knew how to read before I got married. For example, I was a voracious reader of the tabloids in the lines at the supermarket.

The Journey of the Parent with a Special Needs Child

I think it’s time we acknowledge the internal emotional experience of a parent of a child with special needs.  This is a journey, and there are times when you will feel traumatized or in disbelief with your experience, and times when you wish it would ‘all go away.’  As professionals, we spend a great deal of time providing information about ‘how to’ or ‘how to not’ and instead, I’d like to focus on validating your feelings and thoughts.

IASO (Immature Adrenaline Systems Over-reactivity), AKA Aggressive Behavior

Aggressive or violent behavior can be a very difficult and discouraging issue to manage, especially for special needs parents and caregivers. Violent behaviors hinder progress in IEPs, in learning plans, and in becoming mature in personal independence and social skills.

Helping the Siblings of Children on the Spectrum

I often wonder how my son appears through my daughter’s eyes.  She adores him; this is clear.  But what does she make of the sudden outbursts, the seemingly unprovoked anger, and the daily challenges that a family with a child on the spectrum lives with?  How does she feel about the attention and resources that are focused on her big brother?  How will she feel later, as she grows up and learns to cope with the world in ways he simply cannot?  Will she act as his protector?  Will

Show Me the Money and Failure to Thrive

Obama’s healthcare debate filled the radio airwaves the weeks before daughter was born.  I would drive to doctor’s appointments, hoping that Mr. Obama’s reforms would go through and amazed at history in the making.  I could not fathom paying for every little part of the healthcare we receive -- we simply cannot afford it.  This became especially apparent after the birth of my daughter, Little Miss Adorable.

Mindfulness Awareness-Avoidance

The other day there was a knock at my door.

Battle to Autism Diagnosis

Recently, within a few days, two of my friends confided in me that they are starting to think one of their kids (two different families) may be on the Autism Spectrum, and then they asked how I knew my son had Autism. I’ll admit that my ex-husband (we were married at the time) was the one who brought it to my attention when the kids were 18months old. I was surprised.