Special Needs App of the Day: Tap to Talk

Special Needs App of the Day:  Tap to Talk

Tap to Talk is a new application by Assistyx that “turns handheld devices like smart phones and tablets into AAC (Augmentive and Alternative Communication) devices.”  For those individuals unfamiliar with those terms, this app assists nonverbal children communicate.

For those parents and caregivers of nonverbal children, meeting your child’s needs on a daily basis can be a struggle.  However, through the use of technology, new ways of communication become easier and more manageable.

The app features categories such as places to go, things to eat, and emotions.  When a child taps on a category, a voice states which subject area the child is entering.  The child then has options to choose from, and the child can tap on the picture.  For example, when entering the things to eat category, the app states “I’m hungry,” and the child can choose the picture of the food her wants to eat -- if he chooses a carrot, the voice speaks, “a carrot, please.”

Features of this app include:

  • Customization:  You can choose pictures from the Tap to Talk library, or you can add your own.  You can also include your own text and sounds.  The Tap to Talk designer allows you to create the environment appropriate for each individual.
  • Portable:  Since the app is available for smart phones and tablets, it can be taken anywhere.
  • Smart design:  The app is developed by Phil Bookman, an expert on creating technology-based educational tools for special needs kids.

Parents who use the app say it is a more affordable alternative to other assistive communication devices, and it is easy to use.

Tap to Talk costs $99.95 per year, or you can choose a “forever” option for $179.95.  Tap to Talk is not a toy, and it is a powerful communication tool.  You can try the app for free to see if it works for you and your child. Tap to Talk gives the nonverbal child a voice, and it might be a welcome alternative to other AAC devices.

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Written by: Candice Evans See other articles by Candice Evans
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